Diploma in interactive media and technology

Michael has designed and directed an intensive study of interactive and new media history, theory and practices called the Diploma in New Media/Sonic Design for the School for Studies in Art and Culture, Carleton University, including 2 digital media labs and a substantial online and video-mediated presence. The diploma was open to music, film, and art history students, and some courses were available as electives to mass communications, architecture, and engineering majors. The diploma was available as both a concentration within BA/B.Mus degrees, and offered as a stand-alone academic diploma. Here is a screenshot of the diploma’s webpage.

Diploma in Music and New Media

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I designed and delivered 5 full-year courses including 3 lecture courses totaling 216 classroom hours, a professional work study, and a graduating ePortfolio project including a monthly class presentation. My area of expertise is digital artd production and composition, and it was necessary for me to become fluent in the broader context of new media in order to design and teach this diploma. I also became a visiting worker at the National Research Council and the Communications Research Centre during my tenure at Carleton, and became a consultant on some of Canada’s groundbreaking virtual classroom/distance education research projects. My goal was to make this diploma into a seamless real-world/virtual learning experience.

“Media and Technology in Art and Culture” was the diploma’s introductory course. I have posted the course outline here:

Media Technology in Art and Culture

This is an example of my introductory course notes which was also based upon an article published by:

Leonardo: the journal of art, science, and technology (MIT Press)

Subsequent courses included:

  • a comprehensive survey course of computer applications and commercially-available resources (24 lectures, 72 hours in total);
  • an introduction to object-oriented programming (12 lectures, 36 hours);
  • object-oriented programming and project development (8 lectures, 4 student seminar sessions, 36 hours);
  • supervised work study placement with professional partners (7 hours per week over 24 weeks);
  • a graduating ePortfolio (24 weeks, including one monthly group meeting with supervisor’s presentation).

This is a slide presentation I derived from my courses, which I have delivered as a regular visiting lecturer to the Computing and Creative Arts Program at Queen’s University, Kingston, Ontario:

Electroacoustics: noise, technology and the new musical aesthetics

I produced a series of documentary videos for this course entitled “Prototypes”, an introduction to the history of electronic media and the exploratory worlds where art, science, technology and culture meet. The following episode is presented in the first lecture:

Prototypes: the art of the electronic age

Finally, I’d like to show you some of the amazing projects created by the students for their honours e-Portfolio:

1. Alison was a chip architect at Nortel who wanted to study interactive media. This is her incredible project: The Connections Project.

2. Maya wanted to work in digital animation. She is now a grad student at Ryerson. Here are some of her works: Maya animation.

3. Andrew was a music and film student who was fascinated with immersion and interactivity. He created a presence-sensitive environment in OSX. He is now a grad student and TA at SFU. Here are his storyboards and code: Immersion.

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